December highlights from the world of scientific publishing

7th Jan 2014

Some of what I learned last month from Twitter: takedowns, luxury journals, moves in peer review services and more.

‘Luxury journals’

A big talking point on my Twitter feed in December was the provocative comments about journal publishing made by Randy Sheckman as he received his Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine. Writing in the Guardian on 9 December, he criticised the culture of science that rewards publications in ‘luxury journals’ (which he identified as Nature, Cell and Science). He said “I have now committed my lab to avoiding luxury journals, and I encourage others to do likewise.” Although many applauded this, some pointed out that more junior researchers may not have the freedom to do likewise, and also mentioned Schekman’s potential conflict of interest as Editor-in-Chief of the new, highly selective journal eLife, which aims to compete for the best research with these journals (some responses are summarized by Stephen Curry). Schekman responded to the criticisms in a post on The Conversation, and suggested four ways in which the research community could improve the situation.

Elsevier steps up takedown notices

Subscription journals generally require the author to sign a copyright transfer agreement that, among other things, commits them not to share their paper widely before any embargo period has passed. It appears that in December Elsevier decided to increase their enforcement of this by sending takedown notices to sites where Elsevier papers were posted. Guy Leonard described what happened to him and the reaction on Twitter and elsewhere.

Various peer review developments

Jeremy Fox (@DynamicEcology), a population ecologist at the University of Calgary, explained why he likes the journal-independent peer review service Axios Review (and is joining their editorial board).

Publons, which gives researchers credit for post-publication peer review, announced that researchers can now also get credit for their pre-publication peer reviews for journals.

Wiley announced a pilot of transferable peer review for their neuroscience journals, in which reviews for papers rejected from one journal can be transferred to another journal in the scheme, thus saving time.

F1000Research announced that its peer reviewed articles are now visible in PubMed and PubMed Central, together with their peer reviews and datasets. Articles on F1000Research are published after a quick check and then peer reviewed, and indexing by PubMed and PubMed Central happens once an article has a sufficient number of positive reviews.

Jennifer Raff, an Anthropology Research Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin, published “How to become good at peer review: A guide for young scientists“, a very useful and comprehensive guide that she intends to keep updated as she receives comment on it.

Miscellaneous news

Jeffrey Beall, a librarian who has been curating a useful list of ‘predatory’ open access journals for several years, revealed his antagonism to open access as a whole in an article that surprised many with its misconceptions about the motivations of open access advocates. PLOS founder Mike Eisen has rebutted the article point by point. Although I feel that Beall’s list is still useful for checking out a new journal, it should be taken only as a starting point, together with a detailed look at the journal’s website, what it has already published, and its membership of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA).

James Hayton (@JamesHaytonPhD) wrote a great post on his 3 Month Thesis blog on the seven deadly sins of thesis writing, which should also all be avoided in paper writing: lies, bullshit, plagiarism, misrepresentation, getting the basics wrong, ignorance and lack of insight.

Finally, I was alerted (by @sciencegoddess) to a new site called Lolmythesis, where students summarize their thesis in one (not always serious) sentence. Worth a look for a laugh – why not add your own?

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