Journal news for February

1st Mar 2012

News related to scientific journal publishing since 4 February.

Elsevier withdraws support for the Research Works Act

Since I covered this infamous draft US law and the associated boycott of Elsevier by academics (here and in news here) the flood of blog posts on the topic has continued, and I won’t attempt to summarise them here. But the pressure seems to have had an effect: on 27 February Elsevier announced that it is no longer supporting the act, although they ‘continue to oppose government mandates in this area’.

Meanwhile, a new act has been proposed, the Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA), which would mandate that all research funded by every federal funder with a budget over $100 million should be made open access 6 months after publication.

Industry group ‘threatens’ journals to delay publications

The Lancet has reported (pdf) that the Mining Awareness Resource Group (MARG) has written to several scientific journals advises journals not to  publish papers from a US government study of diesel exhaust and lung cancer until a court case and congressional directives are ‘resolved’. The editor of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dana Loomis, is quoted as saying ‘It is vague and threatening. This has a chilling effect on scientific communications—a matter of grave concern.’

New open access journal

The open access journal Biology Open has been launched by the Company of Biologists. The journal aims to provide the research community with ‘an opportunity to publish valid and well-conducted experimental work that is otherwise robbed of timeliness and impact by the delays inherent in submission to established journals with more restrictive selection criteria. ‘

Twitter and paper citations

An arXiv preprint has found a correlation between mentions of a paper on Twitter and its later citations.

Criteria for the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014 announced

The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) has announced the criteria and working methods that the panels for the assessment of research using the Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) will use. REF will use citations as part of assessment but not impact factors or other bibliometrics (see page 25 of the full report for the statement regarding citations in the biology and medicine panel). Researchers at English universities will no doubt be scrutinizing the guidelines carefully.

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I’m sorry there hasn’t been a weekly Journal News recently, as I had hoped, and that this update is rather brief. I hope that the usefulness of these news updates depends more on their content than their regularity. If you want (much) more frequent updates from the world of journals and scientific publication, do follow me on Twitter!

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